Guidelines

Pieces will be accepted on their merits. Please limit submissions to 3 items per issue (poetry and prose considered as separate entries). Flash fiction and flash non-fiction will be considered in each category, limited to 500 words. To maximize diversity, we publish no more than one work per contributor per issue. We read 100% blind, so do not include your name or any other identifying information.

Please do not submit previously published work. Simultaneous submissions are ok, but please let us know promptly if your work has been accepted elsewhere.  We generally do not notify submitters until after the submission period has closed and all pieces have been reviewed.

Submit one MS WORD document in .doc or .docx with each piece beginning on a new page. Do not include your name or any other identifying information. Instead, submit a separate cover page with your contact information, the name(s) of the piece(s), and a biography of 60 words or less. Please use a popular font such as Calibri, Arial, or Times New Roman, 12 point. We prefer single-spaced formats, except when alternate spacing is a deliberate part of the layout.

Hard copy will not be accepted and will be destroyed. We adhere strictly to our deadline (US Central time zone). Any submissions received after 11:59 pm of the closing date for the Call will be automatically rolled into the next submission period for consideration. Thanks for thinking of panoplyzine.com!

We use Submittable. During an open call, please submit at: Panoply’s Submissions Page

Editors’ Choice, February 14 – 20, “Endurance,” – Molly Fuller

Explore a little dialogue and repartee while Molly and Sara explore the material and the ethereal. Human relations affect us in as many ways as poetry.

Sara says there is always the wanting like an ache  It never leaves us
after the ones we love do  After they leave us behind, alone on this earth

There is so much falling into and out of and hoping to be caught
and the rocks are breaking beneath our feet, can you feel them?

Can you feel the rocks shifting?  This planet is not our home
We don’t live here anymore Sara says we are visitors, we are

plunderers, we have taken too much and the plasticity of our love
is not our only sin in this world  Sara talks and talks and I love the way

her mouth moves on the softness of my body  I love the way her mouth
feels on my mouth  I take Sara’s hand   I hold her in my arms  I tell her this

tender moment can last, it can last I tell her knowing that it is fleeting
even as I’m saying it  I can feel her body leaving my body and already

we are becoming ghosts to each other and all the trees are on fire
and the carcinogens in our breasts are multiplying as we stroke each other

softly, embers glowing in the darkness of the night     Sara says she understands
my soft feelings   She says she wants to protect them and hold on to me

as if we were falling  I say that’s nice hon but I’m too far down already
I can’t see the forest or the trees I say  Sara looks through me

Right through me and says the wanting will never end, it won’t ever end
she says but it will become bearable   I close my eyes and see her  I always see her

She pulls me toward her and my skin is cracking and fevered  I say
this is nice, but I know I’ve already messed up   I can only see the trees

are burning   Sara looks at me   I can find her with my eyes closed
Sara says she always wants to feel pain, or else why still live?  She says that to be

alive is to suffer  She asks me, don’t you feel the water rising?  We are robbers,
she says, we put in so much effort and we think the flexibility of our killing

will save us    It is not our only sin in this world   Sarah talks and talks
and I want her mouth to move on the softness of my body   I love the way

she makes my body feel  My skin breaks and heats up  Weightless
as the sea, my cells constellations of fire   This love is unbearable

Molly Fuller is the author of the full-length collection For Girls Forged by Lightning: Prose & Other Poems (All Nations Press). Her work has appeared in 100 Word Story, Kestrel, Oklahoma Review, and NANO Fiction. Fuller was a Finalist for the Key West Literary Seminar Emerging Writer Award. She received her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.

For previous Editors’ Choices, please visit:
Sarabande – Robert René Galván
an excerpt from “A Place, A Feeling, Something He Said To You” – Alexandra Naughton
Lines Composed on First Regarding Godzilla after An Uneasy Serenity of Fifty Years – Bruce Robinson
Finches Prefer Chopin – Raymond Byrnes

Editors’ Choice, February 7 – 13, “Sarabande,” – Robert René Galván

How humans can elevate their own miserable condition by pulling a beet from the ground and lifting the spirits along with the precious food. Life has a rhythm and a melody.

for Zuzana Růžičková

She clutched the leaves
in her hand
as she waited
to be loaded
onto the waiting truck.

Somehow, an angry wind
lifted the notes
and they sailed
down the street
like runaway kites,

But the music rode
along in her heart,
persisted through
every kind of horror,
from Auschwitz
to Bergen-Belsen,
antithesis of the camp
accordion and broken
strings’ blithe
accompaniment
to endless roll calls
in the bitter cold,
starvation,
dehydration,
executions
and the merriment
of the guards.

Those pages looped
in her head
even as she wrestled
a stray beet from the cold ground,
digging with her fingernails
to feed her dying mother.

When she returned
to Prague,
her hands were ruined,
and new monsters
would soon appear
in the streets,
but the Sarabande sang
in her insistent fingers
until it circled the soiled world
like a golden thread.

* Harpsichordist, Zuzana Růžičková, is considered one of the great musicians
of the 20th century.  She survived Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen.
 
The work in question is J.S. Bach’s E minor Sarabande from the fifth book of English Suites.
Růžičková had written it out by hand at the age of 13 to take with her during her internment.

Robert René Galván, born in San Antonio, resides in New York City where he works as a professional musician and poet. His last collection of poems is entitled, Meteors, published by Lux Nova Press. His poetry was recently featured in Adelaide Literary Magazine, Azahares Literary Magazine, Gyroscope, Hawaii Review, Stillwater Review, West Texas Literary Review, and the Winter 2018 issue of UU World. He is a Shortlist Winner Nominee in the 2018 Adelaide Literary Award for Best Poem.

To read previous Editors’ Choices, please visit:
an excerpt from “A Place, A Feeling, Something He Said To You” – Alexandra Naughton
Lines Composed on First Regarding Godzilla after An Uneasy Serenity of Fifty Years – Bruce Robinson
Finches Prefer Chopin – Raymond Byrnes

Issue 14, Winter – 2020

(184

Photograph © 2019 Ryn Holmes

Welcome to Issue 14. For those of you returning, we thank you for joining us once more. For you first-timers, we hope you enjoy what you find here. One special feature of posting an issue just after New Year’s Day is that we compile it over the holidays, smack-dab in the middle of the season, our spirits growing and flowing. It’s a gift to and from so many, and the warmth it brings to us is one of the highlights of the holidays.

You may have noticed we switched our masthead theme from flowers to abstract photography by Co-Editor Ryn Holmes. Pardon the plug, but it’s fascinating, innovative stuff. You’ll see more of these as the issues continue.

Meanwhile, Issue 14 should keep you artistically occupied and satisfied. We tend to see motifs from issue to issue. One of this one’s is women’s experience and consciousness, particularly as girls become women. Not all is princessing, it’s clear. But the art is just as sparkling. Naturally, the fine work here covers a, dare we say it, panoply of subjects, something for everyone.

We must admit that due to a glitch in our submissions process, we received far more submissions than usual, a good problem to have! That helps explain why we’ve included more contributions than usual. They’re all so deserving and gleaming.

Thanks again for your support and attention. 

Best wishes,

Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Table of Contents

2059: Cut Off – Alan C. Smith
Airness – Pablo Saborío
Apollo 11 – Sharon Scholl
Augury – Greg Friedmann
Being Made Ready – Maria Berardi
Beneath My Feet – Sarah Valeika
The Birds – Ian Ganassi
Borrowed – Sean Bolton
A Child Says Morning – Max Heinegg
Civilized – Daniel Edward Moore
Crumbling – Stephen Ground
Dawn By The House of Stone That Jack Built – Vassilis Zambaras
The Days We Meet – R.T. Castleberry
Dying in Paradise – Christy Bailes
Endurance – Molly Fuller
Exit Wounds – Andy N
Feeling Empathy Outside of Santa Maria del Fiore – Adam Webb
Fell in Love with You – John Grey
Finches Prefer Chopin Raymond Byrnes
Half Light – Doug Bolling
Hard Jazz – DS Maolalai
He’s Dead – Patricia Walsh
Heather in Bloom, Morning – Gerald Kells
A House of Your Own Making – James Diaz
In Line at Banco Central – Tim Hawkins
In Memory of An All-Girl Band (A Cento) – Andrew Sunshine
In the Fog – Steve Klepetar
Is Your Forgetfulness Normal? – Barbara Daniels
Kitsch – George Franklin
Last Days of JuneCorbin Louis 
The Last Voyage – Howie Good
Leave-takings – Robert Nisbet
Lines Composed on First Regarding Godzilla after An Uneasy Serenity of Fifty Years Bruce Robinson
Lullaby for a Politician – Jennifer Bradpiece
The Made and the Unmade – Carolyn Adams
The Music at Montreaux – Matthew James Friday
My English Teacher – Michael Minassian
My Mother’s Ghost Knits a Scarf of Chain – Robert Okaji
Mystery Confirmed – Megan Wildhood
Near Salt River Road: An Elegy for S.D. – Rita Chapman
Nectar – Christopher Wilson
No end to wonder – Hugh Anderson
Pantoum of the Thoughts That Have Been Turning Over in My Head Since I Moved Out a Month Ago – Jacob Bennett
Pareidolia Megan Merchant
Parallax View – Betsy Mars
Pathing – Vivian Wagner
Patriot’s Chain – Anthony Dennis
peace has its season – Disha Trivedi
Pink Bee – Cliff Saunders
an excerpt from “A Place, A Feeling, Something He Said To You” – Alexandra Naughton
Playing Guitar at Ritter Park – Ace Boggess
[A position we’ll all get] – Blake Francis
Praying Mantis – Penelope Schott
Raven – Kathryn Jordan
Record Low – Russell Rowland
Refugee/fugitive – Sean Urbina
Salsa – Jacob Butlett
Sarabande – Robert René Galván
She Takes a Taxi – Gemma Cooper-Novack
Shifting, Too Anxious to Be Fully Aware – Jonathan Yungkans
That Other Guy – Lenny DellaRocca
This can’t be right – Giovanni Mangiante
Time Flies – John O’Hare
Tuesday in the Home Town – Tom Willemain
Two – Nitya Gupta
Vasculitis – Jared Pearce
Violation – Claire Massey
Warren’s Weathered Barn – Keith Moul
We’re Just Talking – Melissa St. Pierre
What Jesus did do – Dennis Finnell
What Words Cost – Sandy Coomer
When a ’54 Fender Stratocaster Becomes a Fetish – Karla Linn Merrifield
When Coburg Lake Became a Kyrenia Wedding – Angela Costi
Wildfires in Iraq – Sarah Mills
You Cannot Strike a Bargain – Nancy Levinson

Review of MOURNING AN INTERIOR COUNTRY, By Aaron Dargis


Finishing Line Press
ISBN 978-1-64662-063-0
Price: $14.99
34 Pages

Submitted by Andrea Walker
October 25, 2019

Aaron Dargis’ opening poem “The Garden, Ars Poetica” in his chapbook, Mourning an Interior Country, draws the reader in with its beauty and stark contrast between parched dry crops and living green weeds. In his collection of thirty-two poems, he describes interior countries of geographical as well as psychological landscape. Just as the “ear is to the soil listening,” readers will attentively listen to the voice of this poet with acute awareness, a recurrent theme throughout his poetry.

The terrain of northern Michigan, Lake Superior, Keweenaw Peninsula, Au Train River serves as backdrop. The reader feels the cold in “wind cuts wool and cotton to bone.” In this fierce climate, the poet questions the purpose of memory, the past, and fear, yet dives into those areas as surely and fearlessly as he “dives into the lake.” Repeated imagery of tangled reeds, lily pads and brambles suggest a tone of fear and being trapped, then again diving into the thing one fears.

Written in first person, the poems reveal a speaker who is on a painful journey to the interior country of self where the often stark terrain serves as metaphor. The speaker searches the past, revisiting places of childhood, towns, neighborhoods, homes, admitting he’s searching in “Map as Self-Portrait.”

I’m learning to remember lost time–
Those lakes of the mind have dried, filled
my reservoir of loss.
Rivers cut deep. I’m trying to find places
I haven’t been. Where deeper into
interior country is now foreign–
what leads the heart to such depths?

Though the mood is often solitary, and the journey is within, the reader is grateful the speaker is not always alone. One first meets the other in a pair of companion poems “Kitchen Sink” and “Mourning an Interior Country.” A woman waits patiently for him to come home, “fiddle the doorknob– liquored, speaking gently for my body,” and he does, knowing someone awaits, “I fiddle the doorknob, shoulder into the kitchen.” She appears throughout the collection smoking, unpacking, comforting in various ways.

All the poems are meditative, but it’s apt to have a group of small poems entitled “Meditations,” ten concise powerful moments reminiscent of the brevity of haiku minus the form. Repeatedly, we read a comparison of wind and the past, for example, in “Painting Au Train,” “Winter Meditations in a Cabin V,” “An Oak, Ars Poetica.”

The poet uses contrast effectively by moving among seasons and place randomly, including the occasional hot day or poem about a southern state, and although the pace is mostly slow, even a surprising allusion to violence, “I fired into a frozen pond.” The reference to the gun, although infrequent, suggests the conquering aspect of nature. The brutal image of a dead swan accompanied by paw prints of a coyote reminds the reader of nature’s violence. In contrast to contemplation, the matter-of-fact admission of drinking a fifth of whiskey one day, drunk howling at the hot day, or hungover give the reader a glimpse of a man with (forgivable) flaws.

The interior of Northern Michigan is populated with birds of every feather; the speaker observes, and describes the red-winged blackbird, grey partridge, grouse, robin, finch, among others, noting their behavior, sometimes envying them. The lush landscape is home to calves, a doe, and salmon, carpeted with grass, moss, ferns, and stone, canopied with leafy trees and clouds. It is blanketed with snow, and its thirst is fed with lakes and rivers.

The stark interior of the mind is painted with questions: somber, dark, lonely and mournful. The speaker expresses himself quite well even as he questions his ability to express his feelings. With one vivid phrase and image after another, Aaron Dargis pays a haunting tribute to memory and time in the gorgeous fertile setting of Northern Michigan.

Aaron Dargis grew up in Michigan and lives in the foothills of South Carolina. His poetry has appeared in catheXis Northwest Press, UpNorth Lit and Panoply Magazine. This is his first publication.

To read other chapbook reviews, please visitPrevious Chapbook Reviews

Pushcart Prize Nominees for 2019

Please join us in congratulating this year’s nominees. We hope you have and will enjoy their work as much as we have. Check them out – we’re sure they have plenty of additional fine work. 

Being a Bishop – RC deWinterRC DeWinter

At The Scottish Gallery a Baobhan Sith Takes a Pass on a Local Vicar – Linda KennedyLinda Kennedy

Bottled Ship – Aris KianAris Kian

Artisan – Karen McAferty Morris Karen McAferty Morris

Lazarus Explains – Bruce McRaeBruce_McRae

What a Middle Name Is – Liam Strong Liam Strong

 

Issue 13, Summer – Autumn, 2019

IMG_5587 purple flowers

Photo by Andrea Walker

Greetings in summer! We hope that during the heat of the season, you took time to savor the simple beauty of things. They abound! Issue 13 abounds with simple beauty as well, for which we thank our contributors. This issue includes an unusual number of longer pieces, many pop culture allusions, and a higher quantity of pieces with real attitude, verging on irreverence! As usual, we think you’ll enjoy the wide variety of themes, styles, and voices.

Look for Editors’ Choices weekly beginning in September. We’ll also have a new chap book review and our annual nominations for the Pushcart Prize, a real highlight for us all. Thanks for reading Panoply. Stay cool and reverent.

Best wishes,
Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Table of Contents

13th and Island Detox Robert Rickelman
After 10 days roughnecking Oklahoma oilfields – Steve Gerson
After a Revolution – Susan Tepper
Agony of the Leaves – Blaise Allen
And So She Missed Early Spring – Amy O’Hearn
And Then She Walks Away – Kathleen Hogan
Avalon – Patricia Nelson
Before Sweat Had a Name – Katherine Hoerth
Bottled Ship – Aris Kian
Burial Site – Remi Recchia
Cactus Flower – Tova Feldmanstern
Chasing Grace – Lauren Scharhag
Coughing at the Wake – Linda Johnston Muhlhausen
Cynthia – Lenny DellaRocca
Daughters, spring – Arlyn LaBelle
Day 63 – Robert L. Penick
Dream Back – Timothy Pilgrim
A Dress to Die ForSarah Brown Weitzman
The Epicurean Candidate – Nick Romeo
Epiphany – Sheila Black
Faye Taking a Breath – Rikki Santer
Feeder – Max Heinegg
Generations Heeling – Greg Maddigan
Green Pastures – Seth Grindstaff
Grief in 3 Years – Nicole McCaffety
hatchlings – Leo Levinsky
Hermits – Jessica Sommerfeldt
How to Live Stoned – Bob Hoeppner
It’s Aye Been – Carol Stewart
Joint Custody – Sherri Wright
Knock, Knock. Who’s There? Blasphemy, Who? – Jennifer Maloney
Learning by Heart – Laura Foley
Linnets – Hilda Weiss
Looking for Tommy Underwater – Zack Hutchinson
lord and taylor – Wayne-Daniel Berard
Loug Kya Kahen Gay – Laiba Fatima
Love Letter to the Blues Adrian Potter
Museum Diana Donovan
My Block of Time Barbara Crane
My Way Patricia Carragon
The One Who Always Gets Away Philip Kobylarz
Outer Banks Beach Ed Ahern
The Palm Reader of Hempstead Gianna Sannipoli
Pass Chad W. Lutz
Perfect Date Night Lucas Shepherd
Why We Stopped in Petra Andy Oram
Protected Frances Koziar
Reflection Laura Johnson
Reindeer Beards Susan Kay Anderson
The Return Karen McAferty Morris
road-house Stephen House
Silver Robert Nisbet
Snowdonia Alan Parry
Stranger Jason Emde
Suburban Wild Joanne Furio
Summary in Free Verse 2 Ann Mikusinski
Synesthesia Gage Crowder
There Were So Many Apples Elena Nailyevna
These Days Erika Noel Johnson
Through the Keyhole Christie Marra
Understory Stephanie L. Harper
We Were Sitting by the River Alec Solomita
What a Middle Name Is Liam Strong
Window Mzwandile Poncana
Windows Taught Us One Thing Jonathan Yungkans
you lift your finger carefully as if heavy with paint Kate LaDew

Issue 12, Spring/Summer 2019

Old Stuff 049

Photo by Andrea Walker

Spring has sprung throughout North America. Trees have been in bud here in Pensacola for a few weeks now, the joy of rebirth and renewal. Our contributors renew our own spirits, and we hope they renew yours as well! 

Once again, we happen upon bunches of work that touch on certain themes. Coincidence is nearly a rule here at Panoply! Issue 12 features a clutch of poems about sex; another about family; another about home towns, both current and former. And of course, there are a host of other wonderful works on a variety of other themes, all flowing with art and wonder. We hope you enjoy the issue!

Issue 13, unthemed, is scheduled for publication around August 23, with our Call for Submissions, July 5-28. We’ll update our announcements as those dates approach. As usual, we’ll be posting our weekly Editors’ Choices starting before the end of May, followed by a chapbook review in late June. Thanks to all for submitting; thanks to all for reading.

Best wishes,
Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Contents

#38 – Brendan Connolly
Amid the Alien CornDavid Swerdlow
Among StonesJeff Hardin
April Snow – Ginger Dehlinger
Aqua PuraCharlotte Hamrick
Being a BishopRC DeWinter
Bewitched, Bothered, and BewilderedPatricia Carragon
Caminata Lorraine Caputo
Caught in a Snare – Gloria Nixon-John
County High PointCraig Finlay
Delphi Falls Ellen Austin-Li
Footprints In the SnowLindaAnn Lo Schiavo
GalahadPatricia Nelson
The HostagesNiles Reddick
How to Tell an Old Man He Can’t Climb a Tree – Brooke Schifano
I Saw MyselfJacquelyn Shah
I Didn’t Know Snow ThenLauren Davis
In the knee-high grass of Eastern Montana, Independence is a luxury few can afford – John McDonough
the irreversible futureMike Jurkovic
Japanese KitesPeter Scacco
The Joys of Sex – Ciara Dall
A Kind of Nothing is Prominently There Instead  – Nancy Jentsch
Lazarus ExplainsBruce McRae
LegendMax Heinegg
Like the Big BangCatherine Arra
Mother’s FudgeCL Sostarich
My First Death – Ellen Sander
Naive and Sentimental Sonnet #10Thomas Zimmerman
Newton CornerAndrew Furst
Night Eagle – Dee Allen
Night Watch – S.E. Clark
Noah’s ArkBetsy Mars
A Note on North StarsEmma Johnson-Rivard
The PatriotsTraci Mullins
Pleasant LaneJeremy Voigt
Promise #9Tony Burnett
Reconciling with Home – Brian Fanelli
A Ribbon at at TimeAnn Howells
Saturday Morning Remorse – Adrian Potter
Sex at Sixty – Cheryl Caesar
The Shape of Rain – Lois Harrod
Show Me the Way – David Lohrey
A Simple GestureRobin Wright
SmileBilly Thrasher
Sorrow BedKimberly Becker
Something There is that Doesn’t Love a Neighbor ~ – Ken Gosse
Special Carousel – Gary Glauber
Spend Less Time with Nightingales and Peacocks. One is Just a Voice, the Other Just a Color – Rebecca Macijeski
Spider CatchMark Youssef
Stenciled With Palm Trees and Flamingos – Francine Witte
SugarChristian Fennell
Summer FestivalPaula Kaufman
ThanksgivingJoy Gaines-Friedler
They’ll Call Me Deserter – Darwin Pappas-Fernandes
Tornado WatchCarl Boon
Tune – Gale Acuff
Wasco Woman – Penelope Schott
Without Speaking – Eliana Swerdlow
Your Son’s Birthday PartyKimberly Wright
Your City, My Unincorporated Town – Laura Voivodeship