Issue 21, Spring 2022

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Copyright 2022 Ryn Holmes

Hello Panoply-o-philes!

Who could imagine the events that presented themselves these last few months, particularly here in the US? Is this a rare compression or the new pace of life? We’ve managed to keep up, but this editor is pondering the depths and capacity of hope and faith. 

We’re hopeful and faithful, though, due to the energy, commitment, and devotion contained here in these pages. Call it love. Sometimes, it’s tough love. Sometimes that is required, all we can muster, all with which we must reply. There’s some tough love contained herein. To that, we say, “Hurrah.” Sustain us all.

During WWII, Churchill was asked to cut funding for the arts. He replied, “Then what are we fighting for?’” Indeed. Read some Camus to learn about resistance and redemption. 

To recognize the tragedy and horror in Ukraine, we’ve included a special section on war and peace, oppressor and oppressed, invasion and resistance. This editor is really impressed by the breadth and scope of the pieces included in the Special Section. They lift off from current events, brutal and dramatic as they are, to the timeless and universal. What  a response!

As always, we thank our contributors and readers. Stay healthy. Make it a great day.

Pray for Ukraine.

Love,
Andrea, Clara, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Contents
Coming About – by Alan Perry
Cormorant – by Kathryn Jordan
Driving in Early Winter – by Renee Szostek
The embarrassment of Sierra Escumbre – by Lawrence Hopperton
February Vacation, Ft. Myers, Florida – by Kerry Trautman
The First Sign From My Dead Son – by Melanie Dunbar
The Glittering Girl – by Robert Nisbet
A Gratitude Stone – by Heidi Slettedahl
Horn – by Emma Neale
A Humble Bewilderment of Love – by Nelly Shulman
In the Absence Of Coffee – by George Franklin
In the Dolomites – by Lesley Carnus
Is This One of the Ways to Trap a Butterfly? – by Hedy Habra
jack kerouac goes to the beach – by Louise Kim
Jackpot Romance – by Kevin Ridgeway
Melville’s Whale – by Michael Igoe
The Migratory Bounty of Spring – by Jeannie Roberts
The Morning After – by Ramesh Dohan
Peeling a Tangelo – by Carol Edwards
Pindar – by Januario Esteves
Police Call at Night – by Ann Howells
Return to Florida – by Amanda Valerie Judd
Scaffolders – by Irene Cunningham
Seeing Red – by Simon A. Thalmann
Sonnet on a mote of hope – by William Joel
Stepping Outside My House on Elizabeth Place – by Abby Wheeler
stored in hives – by Corbett Buchly
Traces – by Lynn Lauber
Tyrian Purple – by Jeremy Proehl
Well, she was just seventeen/You know what I mean 2022 – by Lois Bassen
When You’re Done Reading This, I’ll Show You the Real Poem – by Traci McMickle
Who Done It –  by Karla Linn Merrifield
The Woodcutter I Live With – by Katie Kalisz
Worker on a Rainy Saturday – by Mitch Roshannon

Special Section Contents
109 Empty Prams – by Andrea Vasile
And the Wolves in the Factory Paused – by Jon Yungkans
Bamboo Coda – by Jane Rosenberg LaForge
Boundaries – by Holly Guran
Calling the Soul – by Lorraine Caputo
During the Wartime – by Kushal Poddar
an encounter in Fredericton’s Old Burial Grounds (est. 1787) – by Albert Katz
Hopscotch – by Ken Farrell
Indictment – by Harold Ackerman
Ma’s Green Coat – by Lily Prigioniero
Mizocz Ghetto, October, 1942 – by Ken Meisel
Resistance – by Emily-Sue Sloane
The soul eater comes with no strap or boots, his fists tucked in his pockets – by Heather Haigh
Survived – by Toti O’Brien
What I Saw When Looking for my Bones at Lekki – by Ololade Akinlabi

Issue 21 Postponed To No Sooner Than May 13

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Sorry, folks. Editors and publishers are humans too! We’ve been faced with some scheduling and availability priorities which have slowed production of Issue 21. Our goal is to limit the delay to one week, to be confirmed. If so, we look forward to publishing Issue 21 on May 13.

It’ll be worth the wait! Thanks for your patience.

Pray for Ukraine.

Love,
Andrea, Clara, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Help Us Keep Panoply Going!

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Hello Everyone, 

I say it often: “Bandwidth ain’t cheap.” Neither is our submissions software. Will you please consider a donation? Just use the PayPal link here in the right-hand column. We appreciate your generosity! We’re all-volunteer and pay our expenses only through donations, a biennial contest, and our own funds. 

Don’t forget that Clara Burghelea has joined the team as Co-Editor! We’re so pleased to bring her gifts, insights, and contributions to Panoply

Our Call for Submissions for Issue 21, due out in early May, will open next Friday, March 11.

Thanks for thinking of Panoply and for your consideration.

Pray for Ukraine.

Andrea, Clara, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Issue 20, Winter 2022

Issue 20 Masthead

Artwork copyright Ryn Holmes 2022

How time flies! Internally, we’re marveling at our milestone of 20 issues. Issue 21 will complete our seventh year, quite a journey that began with outdoor coffee at dusk. Not quite a garage band or a garage business, but you get the idea!

2021 brought a great deal of personal disruption to this Team. (Join the club, right?) We’re fortunate to have each other and to be able to share the wonders laid before us. When physics hurts, go for metaphysics.

Issue 20 ushers in  two poems about grief, two from women named Roberta and two from women named Chris, a Christmas ditty and a New Year’s welcome, high school memories, some very short pieces, some very long ones, artistic allusions galore, and more to delight and inspire.

As always, thank you submitters, contributors, readers, and benefactors. We derive great satisfaction from our little place in this expanding world of the written word and hope you do as well.

Let’s make it a great year!

Love,
Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Contents
#1 Poetoum – Laurie Byro
After Discovering Mother’s Passport – Tina Barry
After “Landscape and Jacaranda,”– Peter Mitchell
All Songs – Barry Peters
All Those Wildflowers – Renee Cronley
At the Back Fence – Karen Loeb
Before This, The Occaneechi – Maura High
Between Being and Not Being – Matthew Friday
Between the Moon and Me – William Reichard
Black Stones – Steve Gerson
Capnomancy – Chris Armstrong
Childhood Never Happens Again – Ryan Quinn Flanagan
Commentary  L. Ward Abel
Diners – Rachel R. Baum
The First Stage of Grief – Jane Snyder
Grief
Gust – JC Niala
Happy New Year, San Miguel de Allende – John Milkereit
Indecent Exposure – Roberta Schultz
Jeanne d’Arc of the Suburbs – Laura Jan Shore
Kayak – Katherine Gotthardt
The Keepsake Diner – Don Pomerantz
Kinship – Chris Wood
La Mer – Roberta Brown
The Leaf Blowers – Judy Bolton-Fasman
The Lure – by Andrew Jeter
Math Game – Don Noel
Maundy Thursday – Emily Rose Proctor
Morningtide – Diana Dinverno
Musing On Auguste and William – Sharon Berg
A Nickel Short of Heaven – Audrey Howitt
Our Dalliance: Elegy – Linda Jackson Collins
Pandemic Barbie – Dustin Brookshire
Rivals – Charles Rammelkamp
Rural Sonnet – Paul Ilechko
Sand – Alicia Viguer-Espert
Sea Chanteys – Ann Howells
Seeing Life for What It Is – Jeannie Roberts
Sergei’s Hands – Jack Ritter
she had wine with gertrude stein’s widow – Connie Carmichael
Sitting in Bathwater at 1 am – John Casquarelli
Sometimes I Wonder – Scott Ferry
Swam with a whale shark again in 2021 – Sha Huang
Tables of Content – Bruce Robinson
Themes Unbecoming – Victor Pambuccian
Those Dead Shrimp Blues – Charlotte Hamrick
To the Boy with the Golden Hair – Ellen Austin-Li
To Our Executor (first draft) – Tom Barlow
Tonight is the Night I Break Jimmy Taylor’s Poor Heart – Francine Witte
Unexpected Epiphany – Marcelo Medone
A Visit from “The Florida Flash” – Karla Linn Merrifield
Was I Born Hollow – Stephen Douglas Wright
Whisky Hourglass – Hugh Anderson

Proud to Announce Our 2021 Nominations for the Pushcart Prize!

Such a pleasurable experience! As editors, we enjoy reading thousands of pieces each year, coming from all walks of life, all corners of the Earth. Some seem a bit “extraterrestrial!” To compile our issues, then make our 5-6 Editors’ Choices per issue is quite a stimulation and challenge. Then to reduce them to nominees for this prestigious prize is chilling and memorable.

We hope you find the reading just as chilling and memorable. Please join us in congratulating our nominees.

Love and best wishes,

Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

but i am only fiercely dreaming – Perla Kantarjian

Perla Kantarjian 2021

The Juiciest Pear – Issa M. Lewis

Issa Lewis

Or Rather There Are No Lines in the Time – Jonathan Yungkans

Jon Yungkans

Questioners – Abdulrosheed Fasasi

Abdulrosheed Fasasi

Silence – Pete Mackey

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The Stables on Solly Avenue – Mary Rohrer-Dann

Mary Rohrer-Dann

Issue 19, Summer 2021

Panoply Issue 19 Masthead

Photo by Ryn Holmes, Copyright 2021.

Welcome to Issue 19! We’re pleased to bring you more of the contemplations, wonders, journeys, and time travels of our fine contributors. This summer has been one of tumult and disruption for us here at Panoply, but our submitters’ dedication to the craft buoys us. We hope it propels you into a fine autumn! Stay safe and healthy, everyone.

Love,

Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Contents

Advice to a Wayward Girl – Barbra Nightingale
The Awakening of Hula – Lisa Creech Bledsoe
Bluegrass Baby – Mary Beth Hines
Breathe – Nate Maxson
Buttermilk and Popcorn – Carol Ellis
Class of Rebels – Linda C. Wisniewski
Cross Chest Carry – Roberta Schultz
Damaged Lily – Morgan Boyer
Evening With Lines From Whitman – Hilary Sallick
Every Condo in Toronto – Cole McInerney
For the First Time in 200 Years, a New Blue Pigment is Up for Sale – Lenny DellaRocca
A Grown City – Purbasha Roy
How the Light Escapes Us – Thomas Allbaugh
I Miss Philadelphia – Robert Beveridge
I Wish I Understood Love  George Franklin
In the Blood – Michael Minassian
The Lost Hotel – Steve Klepetar
Meeting the Dire Wolf – Dana Sonnenschein
Night, Old Poet – John Riley
November –John Hart
Now, Then, Later – Margo Davis
Or Rather There Are No Lines in the Time – Jonathan Yungkans
Out of the Park – Daniel Edward Moore
Questioners – Abdulrosheed Fasasi
The Ranger – Robert Nisbet
Requiem for Twenty-Twenty – S.B. Merrow
Saturday – Michael Steffen
Sick of Love – John Grey
Spy Story – James Walton
The Stables on Solly Avenue – Mary Rohrer-Dann
Take Shelter – Akua Lezli Hope
That’s where it ends, the book – Samn Stockwell
Those big-boned, black-haired country boys – Pauletta Hansel
Towards a Nebulous Sun – Lorraine Caputo
A Tragedy’s Brewing – Susan Sonde
Two Girls From Queens Go To Manhattan – Faith Paulsen
Uncharted – Jan Seagrave
The Vulture – Max Heinegg
We Didn’t Cross the Ocean – Mary Anna Scenga Kruch
You ache for something you cannot name – Babo Kamel

Issue 18, Feast-Themed Contest, Spring-Summer, 2021

© 2021 Ryn Holmes

Hello Panoply World!

In this semi-post-Covid world, we’re pleased to share the results of our second biennial contest! Our theme was “Feast,” with a lovely and energizing variety of facets to that stone. Remarkably, on this comparatively short list of pieces, we have two dealing with Russian culture. We’re also pleased to share a piece of bona fide cowboy poetry from a bona fide cowboy poet! Pardon the disproportionate sidebar, but we encourage you to explore cowboy poetry. You might be surprised by the craft but also by the voice, perspective, and subject matter. Whatever your taste, we hope you enjoy Issue 18! We extend our heartiest thanks to all submitters and contributors and especially shout out to our contest winners, Pete Mackey, Issa M. Lewis, and Gabrielle Langley.

Issue 19 is planned for early September, with our Call for Submissions due out July-ish. Don’t forget about our weekly Editors’ Choice videos, the first of which is planned for May 21.

Stay healthy. Keep reading and writing!

All our love,
Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

 

Contest Winners
First Place: Silence – Pete Mackey
Second Place (tie): The Juiciest Pear – Issa M. Lewis and Russian Novel – Gabrielle Langley

Additional Pieces
The Bells of St. Mary’s – Mark Madigan
Beside – Susan Kay Anderson
Bubbe and the Snow Maiden, Vitebsk, 1903 – Mikki Aronoff
A Celtic Spell – Pratibha Castle
Dinner Parties – Rosanne Ehrlich
Eating the Heifer – Sean Sexton
The Eternal Mother – Vanessa Watters
Fat Family – Robert Nisbet
Fire and Ice – Alexis Rhone Fancher
First Holy Communion – Mary Leonard
Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, 1936 – Karen George
In My Mother’s Kitchen – Marianne Forman
Like Fingers – Britton Pontoux
My Blue Heaven – Katherine Nelson-Born
November Seeds – Karla Linn Merrifield
sacrificed into residue – Perla Kantarjian
Safe House – Ysabel de la Rosa
Silver Links – Annette Sisson
Stalk Talk – Jennifer Maloney
We All Bought Tickets to the Allusion – Jonathan Yungkans
Why I Leave the States – Bonnie Jill Emanuel

 

Review of “Mr. Rogers Kills Fruit Flies,” by Scott Ferry

156317865_3044405892462488_6755839660944539326_n-2Scott Ferry

Mr. Rogers Kills Fruit Flies by Scott Ferry
ISBN 978-1-59948-825-7
Main Street Rag Publishing Company
53 pages
$13.00

Review written by Andrea Walker, February 2021

A surprising journey awaits the reader in Scott Ferry’s latest chapbook Mr. Rogers Kills Fruit Flies. This thirty-seven poem collection is chock full of surprises. From the beginning, even the titles evoke curiosity.

The first of three sections is a dramatis personae of ten famous people, with most of whom the reader will be familiar. In addition to Mr. Rogers, this cast of characters, each with his or her own poem, includes Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jane Goodall, Jacques Cousteau, and John Muir. The titles cast each character in a role that appears, like Mr. Rogers, outside that character’s purview. The speaker of each poem tries to make sense of what is happening, for example, when in “John Muir sprains his ankle,” the speaker is thankful he did not injure himself when he fell just down the path from his cabin. Muir/the speaker goes on to muse about understanding

agony, seeing many thousands slaughtered by this
country tearing at itself, not civil at all.

This poem is rich in the imagery, like “elderberry, wild cherry,” and listening to “the ferns reach to the light,” a reader will associate with the man who is also known as “Father of National Parks” Ferry makes keen comparisons of sorrow and joy with frequent use of juxtaposition of unlikely circumstances.

The second section entitled “How to cross eyelid bridge” and containing a poem of the same name is subtitled “Titles of children’s books that will never be written.” Having little to do with children’s books, hence they will never be written, but plenty to do with children with some poems with children as speakers, for example, “The game of erasing yelling.” This poem meaningfully narrates how young siblings negotiate overhearing their parents argue downstairs:

And M said, un-speaking that we should make Jello
and rejoice for pineapple! And I un-replied
that the merpeople nap backwards. She agreed!

In “Talking to the gray woman behind the steeple,” the young speaker is skipping Sunday school and digging for coins left by children who buried them decades ago “behind the ivy bricks” when the ghost of a woman appears and speaks to him in Spanish.

And I can see her Sunday dress to her ankles,
can smell gardenias, can hold the sadness in my teeth.
I don’t know what she has lost, just that she is waiting. . .

The poet portrays a moving image of the child listening to the woman with compassion.

Other characters in this section are plants and insects, animals and organs, and even organisms. The poet reveals himself as a member of the medical profession with some of his language, for example, in “Holden’s cowheart boat” and “How to cross eyelid bridge” and an astute observer of nature, particularly in “Clockwise the sleeping octopus.”

The third and slightly longer section is called “Divination.” The poet defines the various types of prophecy with insightful examples. Arranged alphabetically, like a dictionary, the first is “Aichmomancy: by sharp objects” in which he addresses a fear of and fascination with

. . . the pin, the spear, the record needle
before it slices through dermis into adipose, into viscera?
(Or do I just remember it sinking deeper as a child)

In this poem the speaker looks back on childhood and appears to have reached a level of acceptance of things past. “Cleidomancy: by keys” begins with a somber tone by recalling locked items of the past like the locked safety deposit box of the speaker’s mother and his father’s storage locker with his army helmet. He then moves into the “stretching present,” a more lighthearted time of

daughter refusing all breakfast except Nutella, wife
slipping into sleep by the fire, surprise carne asada
for lunch. . .

One of the most touching is “Nephomancy: by clouds.” Memories of childhood dreams climbing to the clouds where the five-year-old could find quiet or solitude “or the best parts of the people I loved.” This one is divination at its finest.

In addition to celebrities and nonhuman characters, the book is peopled with children. A theme of time runs throughout with references to clocks and units of time from seconds to decades. Along with some serious issues, we discover a poet with a great sense of humor although often expressed in absurd situations. Mr. Rogers kills fruit flies will take the reader off the beaten path into a wonderful and mysterious world of insight and imagery.

For reviews of other chapbooks, please visit: Previous Chapbook Reviews

Issue 17 – Winter 2021

Issue 17 Masthead Photo

Artwork © Ryn Holmes, 2020

Wait, what? 2021?

Congratulations, you made it. But let’s not fool ourselves that a page-turning is alchemy …

No matter the date or circumstances, we love to bring you “a wide array of fine writing.” We do notice incidental motifs in our submissions. This time, it’s insects and long, winding sentences. Of course, there are plenty of other fine works of all types included!

As always, we thank our contributors for favoring us with their talents. (You’ll notice more than one debut writer this time!) And of course, we thank you, readers, for spending a little time here. We hope you continue to find this publication uplifting and enriching.

All our best for a fine year!

Andrea, Jeff, and Ryn, Editors

Contents
1997Tony Gloeggler
Aphrodite and MarsJakub Svanda
Argyle ForestC.B. Crenshaw
AwakeningStephanie L. Harper
but i am only fiercely dreamingPerla Kantarjian
Celestial NavigationDiana Dinverno
The Child BornVirginia Laurie
climb, fall, sober-upKelli Allen
Creatures in the Last HourJulia Watson
The Depth of WaterMarsha Lewis
Every Dream Holds a MeaningSophie Aay
FirefliesMoinak Dutta
First ArtistsKelly DuMar
First FlightNathan McMullen
For Me and For Greta GerwigNaomi Hurley
Heisenberg in the SuburbsGeorge Franklin
Her Face Streaked with TearsZvi Sesling
hesperides – Kolbe Riney
HimselfStephen Ground
Homeless  – Sekhar Banerjee
the hour beforeMike Jurkovic
I Am Not Writing About the Rose, I Am Making it Bloom in the PaperJohn Milkereit
In His DreamAnn Howells
InventoryStacie Kiner
KulturaustauschSean Kelbley
‘Merica the InsidiousMike L. Nichols
Pairing MantidsPaul Jones
PaperHugh Anderson
Path of the DragonflyMarc Janssen
A Published Poet’s ListRha Arayal
The Rabbit Looks AwayIssa M. Lewis
Rainbow ConnectionJaelyn Singleton
The ReceptionLeonard Temme
Red DressKatie Mcilroy
RiverMallory Kellum
Ryou-Un MaruJoseph E. Arechavala
The Simian LineJoanne Clarkson
SorrowBruce Meyer
SpiderRobert Okaji
SplitFrancine Witte
Sweet RetreatEmily Jacko
TableCatherine Arra
Tea As Indicator for WeatherLenny DellaRocca
TragedySheree LaPuma
TwilightMakenna Dillon
Where To Find My BodyCleo-Paulo Valentino
White TulipsCarter Vance
The WriterKelsey Hontz
Year of FirstsJoseph Kerschbaum
You Tell Me It’s the Worst Album EverKate LaDew
You Must Share the Secret of Eternal Life With Someone You LoveSandra Cimadori
Zen ShirtJoseph Hardy